Catch Us If You Can

Upcoming Talks and Stories for Heartland Gardening Bloggers

 

Heartland Gardening bloggers Deb Knapke, Teresa Woodard and Michael Leach recent met for a brainstorming session at Fox in the Snow café near downtown Columbus.

Heartland Gardening bloggers Debra Knapke, Teresa Woodard and Michael Leach recently met for a brainstorming session at Fox in the Snow café in Columbus.

 

The Heartland Gardening bloggers have a busy spring ahead.  Catch them at the following events and look for their stories in the following magazines:

Debra Knapke

  • Feb. 14: Debra will present two talks at the OEFFA conference in Granville — What is a Plant? and Polycultures and Garden Guilds.
  • Feb. 24: Debra will be speaking to the 2016 Delaware Master Gardener class about Annuals and Perennials.
  • March 5: Debra will be speaking on Sustainable Gardens at Wegerzyn Gardens in Dayton.
  • March 17: Debra will be traveling to Connecticut to present The Garden Aesthetic in a Time of Global Climate  Change at the UConn Sustainable Landscape Conference
  • March 19: Debra will be presenting at the Oakland Nursery Spring Fling.
  • April 8: Debra and her daughter, Sarah Arevalo, will be presenting Complementary Design: Embracing Inside and Out at LABash 2016 at The Ohio State University.
  • May 9: Debra will be presenting at the Gahanna Annual Herb Day
  • May 27: Debra will give a talk at Holden Arboretum for the Council of Botanical and Horticultural Libraries. Her topic is: Books, Botany and Horticulture– a Beautiful Combination.

Michael Leach

  • Feb. 20-28:  As the garden stage manager at the Columbus Home & Garden Show at the Ohio Expo Center, Michael Leach has recruited a speaker line-up who will cover everything from backyard beekeeping to growing your own vegetables.
  • Feb. 21, 11 a.m.: Michael will present “Healing Gardens” at the Columbus Home & Garden Show.
  • Spring issue:  Michael’s garden will be featured in the spring issue of Columbus Monthly’s Home & Garden.

Teresa Woodard

 

2016 Garden Trends

Bugs, Biophilia and Boldness

By Teresa Woodard

Hello, 2016! At Heartland Gardening, we ring in the new year with a trends round-up includingCENTS 1 some highlights from this week’s CENTS convention (Central Environmental Nursery Tradeshow) at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in downtown Columbus.

·         Embracing bugs – Today, more than ever, gardeners are appreciating insects’ important roles not just as pollinators but also as decomposers and predators to manage insect populations. They’re adding plants to attract beneficial bugs and rethinking pesticide practices that can harm them.  According to Bug Lady Suzanne Wainwright-Evans, beneficial bugs bring a $4.5 billion value to the green industry. She shared a link to helpful plant lists from Penn State’s pollinator trial gardens.

A new variegated milkweed (Asclepias 'Monarch Promise')

A new variegated milkweed (Asclepias ‘Monarch Promise’)

 

·         Designing biophilic – Economist Charlie Hall says biophilic design is today’s hottest architectural trend. Architects and landscape designers are adopting biophilic design elements to bring nature’s healing qualities to today’s homes and landscapes.  Think green roofs, green walls, natural lighting, water features and green infrastructure.

CENTS wall

Biophilia design elements like green walls, green roofs and green infrastructure

 

·         Changing demographics – Hall also says two changing demographic groups – Millennials (ages 18-34) and Baby Boomers (ages 51-69) will offer opportunities for the green industry. As the Millennials begin to buy homes, they will be adding landscapes, and as Baby Boomers age they will demand more landscape services to maintain their properties.

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Economist Charles Hall at CENTS 2016

 

·         Growing edibles – More and more nurseries are jumping on the edibles trend, so consumers will have even more options at their local garden centers. At the CENTS show, Debra Knapke presented on “Native Edibles” and said that adding plants that have multiple functions, edibility being one of them, is a way to build functional plant communities.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

·         Bold backyards — The Garden Media Group reports homeowners are taking a bolder approach to outdoor living. Customization, new lighting and sound options are driving the trend for these ultra-personalized backyards. Homeowners are moving away from subtle, minimalist aesthetics toward designs that heighten sensory appeal. At the CENTS show, we saw bold tropicals, striking succulents and beautiful porcelain outdoor tiles. In the color palette, orange and sangria continue to be popular colors.  Pantone, the global color authority, recently announced its colors of the year for 2016: Rose Quartz and Serenity (muted shades of pink and blue).  We’ll have to wait and see how these pale colors play out in the horticulture world in the next season or two.

CENTS porcelain

Porcelain outdoor tiles showcased at CENTS 2016

Knapke Garden Tour

 

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By Teresa Woodard

Our fellow blogger Debra Knapke recently invited Michael IMG_6316and me for a tour of her lovely 2/3 acre in northwest Columbus where she’s gardened for 31 years. As a horticulture teacher, author and lecturer, this “Garden Sage” uses her garden in so many ways. She trials new plants, teaches plant ID to horticulture students, experiments with various gardening techniques, explores nature with her grandchildren and finds much peace tending her treasure trove of plants.

Can you tell we loved the garden??? Let us count the ways:

#10 Twenty-five hostas ranging from miniature ‘Popo’ to 3-foot ‘Sagae’

#9 Multiple pots of succulents — haworthia, aloe, agave, gasteria, Senecio rowleyanus (string of pearls), opuntia (variegated prickly pear cactus)

#8 A kaleidoscope of heucheras and heucherellas from a new hybrid ‘Berry Timeless’ to an old-time favorite ‘Frosted Violet’

#7 A bounty of Japanese maples and conifers like firs, larch, weeping blue spruce and false cypress

#6 A gallery of sculpture — even an iron sun that she welded with husband Tony

#5 A bounty of edible treats from alpine strawberries and blueberries to peas, tomatoes and an assortment of greens

#4 Collections of herbs, including sage (for the Garden Sage), lavender (her horticulture thesis plant), 15 thymes, parsley, rosemary and multiple mints

#3 Dozens of natives and wildlife favorites — spring ephemerals, bottlebrush buckeye, cup plant, monarda, pawpaws, little bluestem and more

#2 Lilies for granddaughter Lily

#1 One-of-a-kind treasures

Thanks, Debra, for sharing your wonderful plant collections with us!!!

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Catch Us If You Can

cents showThis week, Columbus hosts one of the country’s biggest Landscape Industry Trade Shows — CENTS 2015 — on January 7-9th.  Debra Knapke will be presenting on two topics: Edible Ornamentals and Complementary Design: Embracing Nature Inside and Out.  In the second one, she will share the stage with her daughter, Sarah Arevalo, an interior designer with Trinity Group in Westerville.  Debra and Sarah will be weaving together the interior landscape and exterior landscape.  For more information on registration and other presentations, check out the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association’s (ONLA) conference website.      OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Catch Us If You Can

Bloggers Debra Knapke and Michael Leach are TV stars, this month.  On Fox 28’s Good Day Columbus, Debra Knapke highlighted edibles at the Heritage Gardens at the Ohio Governor’s Residence.  On another day, Michael appeared on the show to share tips on how to get a jump-start on spring gardening.  Check out his tips on planting spring bulbs, transplanting houseplants, and growing pansies and fall asters.

In the newly released fall issue of Edible Columbus, Debra writes about “Ohio Squash”  and shares tips for cool-season veggies in “What to Plant & Harvest”.  Teresa Woodard also contributes a feature, “Pumpkin Envy”, on Roger Kline who grows award-winning edible heirloom pumpkins.

 

 

 

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